Tag Archives: palermo

Escaping crowds in Italy

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From up and coming destinations to alternatives of big tourist spots, here are three ideas on where to summer in Italy…

Camogli (instead of Portofino) – With the popularity of Portofino down the road, and the drowning crush of people visiting Cinque Terre, the fishing town of Camogli is not only where the Italians go, it is quiet literally a breath of fresh air. It also offers a taste of the real Italy which seems to fading more and more wherever you go. You will actually hear Italian being spoken. Quaint little restaurants offer the daily catch brought in that day and for those in search of luxury accommodation the old world style of the Cenobio dei Dogi will offer views of the sea and a stay very much like the grand hotels along the Amalfi Coast. Should you still want to explore the rest of the crowd filled Italian Riviera at Santa Margherita and Portofino they are only a half hour away. With the assurance you get to leave the madness behind and return to truly relax in Camogli.

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Palermo (instead of Rome) – Nothing is more on the cusp of the next big thing than Palermo. Its about time as this crossroad of many Mediterranean cultures is one of the most important historical cities yet has been ignored by modern travellers for too long. While it still needs to work on its luxury hotel game, the city is filled with landmark sights worthy of your bucket list. From Monreale to the Vucceria market the buzz is palpable. Plus there is a beach close by. All that along with great food and Sicilian tradition, Palermo is fantastico!

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Fasano in Puglia (instead of the Amalfi Coast) – While I agree nothing beats the Amalfi Coast Puglia is quite spectacular as well. Puglia also boasts views of a blue sea for as far as the eye can see, and here there are white washed houses proving this is the land where Italy and Greece meet. Unspoiled beaches, great food and wine, restaurants by the sea are all enjoyed with laid back living. One of the Italy’s most luxurious hotels Borgo Egnazia is truly a magical oasis while the very photogenic (and Instagramable) Masseria Cimino is wonderfully stylish. Not to mention there are lovely towns and villages in the area to visit and explore.

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I am by no means saying don’t go to the more popular places in Italy. But with mass tourism becoming more crushing, and the ‘tourist season’ having less defined dates so many people can get exhausting and change how you feel about your vacation. I just got back from Rome in Spring, a trip I was sure would be an easy bit of fun as I have been many times before so there was no pressure to see everything and I could just enjoy myself. However it seemed like all over town there was masses of kids on school trips, and still many tourists groups everywhere. Granted it was not as bad as in the Summer, but if it was that bad in the Spring how bad will it be by the Summer? I thought back to my Spring trip last year when I did a big journey around Sicily and how much I loved it. Crowds were less, the sights were places I hadn’t seen before, i felt like a traveller not a tourist. It was truly one of the best and most satisfying holidays I had ever taken. So definitely go to all our favourite places but when masses of people get too much, branch out and explore the other corners of Italy. Chances are that a few years down the line they will get popular too and you can say you went there before it got run over by tourists!

 

 

 

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The delightful surprise that is Palermo

Get ready Palermo is about to have its moment…

 

Long passed over as a tourist destination, this dusty capital city is about to regain its grand status. Palermo is a stage, an opera stage. Decorative buildings, noisy and a bit parched, but stately just the same. Centuries of influences from countries all over the Mediterranean make Palermo a cosmopolitan blend of many cultures. A city dense with stunning attractions,  yet scuffed by years of mafia fears which have driven tourists away. But that is all about to change as Palermo has taken steps to clean up its city and its image in hopes to attract visitors once again to this dynamic historical destination.

Getting ready for my first trip to Palermo I didn’t know quite what to expect. I had both excitement and apprehension as my travel date approached. While I had been to Sicily before, I had never been to Palermo and it felt a bit overwhelming given its unfortunate mafia history, and I was a woman traveling alone in a very old world and traditional part of Italy. I would come to find quite rapidly that this was not something to be overly concerned about, the city is vibrant and quite modern. More importantly I was about to discover just how inviting a city it was.

From the start the city was quite welcoming, pleasant and much prettier than I expected. The grandeur of the city, and the Palermitani are very proud of it. Sicilians can be a bit reserved before you get to know them, and here in Palermo it is no different yet people were helpful and eager to show off their hometown. Taking photographs can be met with a bit of apprehension but if you ask first the people are usually very willing and jovial. It is important that you are always polite when traveling but here especially where old customs remain part of daily life. Always say hello or “buongiorno” when entering a shop as these places are usually family run and it is considered an extension of their homes. All that said, travel freely and explore. Palermo is full of expressive winding streets and a soft dilapidated patina. The everyday feels very much like any small village in Sicily just with more people. The bread gets made and delivered, people linger over coffee and walk together in the piazzas.  Prepared to be wowed and won over…

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The travel basics, a general overview:

Hotels: It was difficult to find a hotel I really liked. Unlike most major cities the luxury travel market is sadly lacking in such a choice destination. Many major hotel brands have yet to settle on properties here and the hotel selections are are limited. I chose to stay at the Grand Hotel des Palmes because of its central location and for its historical prestige. It was quite shabby and in need of a serious refurbishment but did capture the essence of a bygone era. (Read my review here Sicily:The tale of two Grand Hotels) But generally speaking this was probably the best I was going to find and it would behoove the city to entice reputable hotel businesses to open new properties in the city.

Taxis: The other tricky situation to maneuver is the taxi situation. There are taxis available but not always where you need them to be. What you mainly find are car services which while safe overall are really interested in giving you a tour of the city or taking you on an excursion to Monreale, the must see church about half an hour out of town. Trying to get them to just take you from point A to point B comes with a discussion (and pressure) of them trying to set up a bigger job with you. Thankfully from my hotel I was able to walk to a great deal, but I did find at the end of a long day of walking the need to jump in a cab and go back to the hotel which is when I was stuck having to take one of these cars. And these cars were the same ‘private car’ the hotel reserved for me on the day I wanted to go to Monreale. And while the driver was charming and got me to my destination I found him insisting on ‘just stopping for a moment’ to show me this or that, never mind that I had made it clear that all I wanted was to go to Monreale and back. I had to finally put my foot down or this would have gone on all day. Alternatively, public buses offer good service and can be fairly reliable.

That established this dramatic city is ripe to be explored with some truly stunning sights to see. Palermo is a stage of delights…

A quick view of the highlights: Start in the heart of Palermo, at the Quatro Canti which is like being in the center of a music box. Thus named because of the four street corners, each representing one of the four seasons and always one corner exposed to the sun. Not far from there is the striking Piazza della Pretoria, with a tiered renaissance fountain in the middle originally made for the city of Florence. While the pride of Palermo is their massive cathedral, the real jewel not to be missed is the Palatine Chapel, a jaw dropping beauty of mosaic work from the floors to the ceiling, this small chapel shines. The walk between the cathedral to the chapel takes you under a massive arch, the former old gate of the city and look at the two whimsical faces carved on the sides. And for die hard Godfather fans the famed opera house is right in the middle of the city. For something truly Sicilian, a visit to the Museo dei Pupi, is a museum dedicated to the craft of wooden puppets, a tradition in Palermo. If there is a puppet show on definitely stay and see it!

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The Markets: Like all great Italian towns, food markets are a must and in Sicily they are particularly spirited. Palermo’s oldest and most famous is the Vuceria, a popular street market selling anything from faux antiques, old photographs and of course fruit and veg. Street food and other food shops also abound. The Ballarò offers the best in produce and is a lot more of a true food market.  If you have time visit both.

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Monreale: If there is one place you must visit it is the glorious church of Monreale just outside of the city. A bus ride or a short cab ride takes you 25 minutes out of the city to the charming town, which is also worth a look, and the famed church. The church itself is breathtaking. Both inside and out the care and workmanship extends from the intricate designs, to the the mosaic floor and ceilings and the painted woodwork. It is perfection. After seeing the inside do not miss the cloisters and gardens.

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Cafes and Restaurants: While I didn’t spend a lot of time there, I did eat at the well regarded Osteria dei Vespri offering an innovative take on traditional Sicilian dishes and flavours. Wonderful place with attentive service and a cozy atmosphere. Antico Caffe Spinnato is Palermo’s Grand Caffe and is great anytime of day for a light bite, coffee, or aperitivo.

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Palermo is buzzing… It has been chosen as the Italian City of Culture for 2018 making it a center for Italian tourism. And equally if not more prestigious, the famed Sicilian fashion designers Dolce&Gabbana based in Milan have finally open a boutique in Palermo and to celebrate launched multiple fashion shows around the city of Palermo. Historical sites such as the Piazza della Pretoria and the Cattedrale were the red carpet runways for the latest collection, heralding that Palermo is open for business and an extremely fashionable destination.

A peak at the Dolce & Gabbana fashion show showcased around Palermo

Where to go next: 2017

Every year I always make a wish list of places to go, some of them new, some are places to return to, but mostly because there is a buzz about them and the time to go is now…

Southern Italy: Mainly Calabria and Basilicata which are looking like the next big things in travel.  While I have been to and mentioned Matera in Basilicata before, with it set to become the 2019 City of Culture it is best to get there before so as to enjoy and explore all the nooks and crannies of the Sassi town without the tour groups. As for Calabria, it is Italy’s final frontier, the ‘toe’ of the boot that is Italy, and mostly overlooked by travellers.  The charming seaside town of Tropea is fast becoming a popular warm weather destination. Get there now.

Patmos: Santorini and Mykonos remain popular and filled with tourists, so where to go with a bit of flair but not the crush of people. Patmos is growing in popularity but still hasn’t hit the tourist Greek island holiday crawl of people. Quaint villages offer romantic views and charming cafes without the clubby atmosphere.

Rhodes: For a bit of history with your Greek Island escapade, Rhodes is a delightful destination. The old town has fortifications built by the Knights of Saint John during the crusades as well as an ancient Greek acropolis

Sayulita, Mexico: Already hot and gaining popularity, this colourful, laid back beach town is far from the madness of Puerto Vallarta and the opulence of big hotels on Punta Mita. On Mexico’s glorious Pacific coast, this artsy little town is a bit more unique.

Iceland: Is the big thing for the right now. Expansive natural landscapes made popular in many big movies and TV shows, have put it on the ‘go to’ travel list. Go for the natural baths of the astonishing Blue Lagoon but stay for the people.

Finland: Is starting to percolate lots more interest in part due to being the Scandinavian country less traveled and in part because Scandinavia is trendy. With Sweden and Denmark already popular, this is Scandinavia with less tourism, good skiing, and unique experiences like sampling Reindeer meat on the menu.

Charleston, South Carolina: For a bit of genteel Americana, the historical city of Charleston in the the United States proudly maintains the southern way of life by upholding traditions and good manners. The historical center boasts pretty cobblestone streets, gas lit lanterns and landmark buildings dating back to the first settlers.

Palermo: Faded yet grand architecture and a faceted history have always made Sicily’s capital city a draw, yet has been ignored or passed over in recent years. With Sicilian cuisine and wine becoming increasingly popular and a new old world sophistication polishing the city, Palermo is starting to buzz.

Provence: For a classic vacation in the purest sense, it is time to return to the south of France, mainly Provence. The land of great painters, this region has it all including great wine and gourmet cuisine, not to mention fields of lavender and perfume. What’s not to love in the land of charming villages.

Northern Italy’s “Second” cities: For a foodie’s trip, head to Bologna, Parma, and Turin. Learn to cook in Bologna, taste some of Italy’s more innovative restaurants in Parma, and hunt for truffles outside of Turin. While “second” cities, they are no lesser than their more famous counterparts, just a little less traveled. All offer historical sites, cafe culture, and most important fantastic dining experiences.

Bon Voyage!

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